Good Health is Hard Work


As the saying goes, “nothing worthwhile comes easily". That could not be truer as it relates to our health. When we see someone beyond childbearing age who is in good health and exudes vitality, life, and youthfulness, we say he or she is fortunate. The truth is that person has done a lot of work to be and stay healthy. It did not just happen. Science supports this. Current gene science tells us our genes are designed for the longevity of the human race, not just for one individual. This makes sense. No one individual is more important than the human species as a whole, though some sure seem to think so. Let’s be clear, in the most basic sense our primary role as humans here on earth is to reproduce. What does that mean to those of us involved in the Self Health for the 21st Century movement? It means that our vital role on the planet is to be as healthy as possible, have healthy children, and instill in them high values of good health. We can do this to help our planet. If we have already had children, we can hope we have done a good job; we see the results of our hard work by looking at our children and grandchildren. Recently I was introduced to a genealogy website on the paternal side of my family. I read essays about my father’s family ancestors and their 200 years in the U.S. I saw common denominators in their lives and mine; they highly valued hard work, family, and good health. You can offer the same to your gene line. While our values may be the same, some things in the 21st Century are drastically different than years past. Many things in our environment and food supply are detriments to our good health. They did not exist in our ancestors’ time. For example, in the mid 20th century artificial food coloring, preservatives, and other additives were introduced to our food supply. We gravitated from a society that primarily ate fresh foods to one that welcomed convenient, highly processed, nutrient deficient boxed and canned foods. Newly developed chemicals --unheard of before the 20th century--from fertilizers to pesticides have been used on our foods and soil, depleting them of nutrients and adding poisons to them. While many advances in science and technology have helped eradicate disease, and educate the masses, common sense and natural health have been shoved aside. It’s time for the tide to swing back to a balance of natural health and fresh foods, along with advances in technology and science. It is not only possible for you and your family to be healthy, but also to be even healthier than your ancestors, and live longer, more active, fruitful lives. Just as they worked hard, so must we. It simply takes hard work to seek the most nutrient filled foods, and make consistently healthy choices while protecting, strengthening and rebuilding our health. It starts with a daily commitment to our good health and that of our children. From a commitment comes better decision making, which is well worth the outcome and will make a difference in the health of future family offspring. Plus, by making this commitment you are among those who are contributing to a better today, and better tomorrow for your children and future generations. While it may be true that nothing worthwhile comes easy, the other common saying is also true: “Anything in life worth having is worth working for.” And good health is certainly worth having and working for.

Good Health is Hard Work


As the saying goes, “nothing worthwhile comes easily". That could not be truer as it relates to our health. When we see someone beyond childbearing age who is in good health and exudes vitality, life, and youthfulness, we say he or she is fortunate. The truth is that person has done a lot of work to be and stay healthy. It did not just happen. Science supports this. Current gene science tells us our genes are designed for the longevity of the human race, not just for one individual. This makes sense. No one individual is more important than the human species as a whole, though some sure seem to think so. Let’s be clear, in the most basic sense our primary role as humans here on earth is to reproduce. What does that mean to those of us involved in the Self Health for the 21st Century movement? It means that our vital role on the planet is to be as healthy as possible, have healthy children, and instill in them high values of good health. We can do this to help our planet. If we have already had children, we can hope we have done a good job; we see the results of our hard work by looking at our children and grandchildren. Recently I was introduced to a genealogy website on the paternal side of my family. I read essays about my father’s family ancestors and their 200 years in the U.S. I saw common denominators in their lives and mine; they highly valued hard work, family, and good health. You can offer the same to your gene line. While our values may be the same, some things in the 21st Century are drastically different than years past. Many things in our environment and food supply are detriments to our good health. They did not exist in our ancestors’ time. For example, in the mid 20th century artificial food coloring, preservatives, and other additives were introduced to our food supply. We gravitated from a society that primarily ate fresh foods to one that welcomed convenient, highly processed, nutrient deficient boxed and canned foods. Newly developed chemicals --unheard of before the 20th century--from fertilizers to pesticides have been used on our foods and soil, depleting them of nutrients and adding poisons to them. While many advances in science and technology have helped eradicate disease, and educate the masses, common sense and natural health have been shoved aside. It’s time for the tide to swing back to a balance of natural health and fresh foods, along with advances in technology and science. It is not only possible for you and your family to be healthy, but also to be even healthier than your ancestors, and live longer, more active, fruitful lives. Just as they worked hard, so must we. It simply takes hard work to seek the most nutrient filled foods, and make consistently healthy choices while protecting, strengthening and rebuilding our health. It starts with a daily commitment to our good health and that of our children. From a commitment comes better decision making, which is well worth the outcome and will make a difference in the health of future family offspring. Plus, by making this commitment you are among those who are contributing to a better today, and better tomorrow for your children and future generations. While it may be true that nothing worthwhile comes easy, the other common saying is also true: “Anything in life worth having is worth working for.” And good health is certainly worth having and working for.